Cyprus Life – in pictures vs Fylde Coast Musings

Our new life in Cyprus began in early March 2004. Originally from a small mill town in Heywood, Lancashire (United Kingdom) we moved overseas spending a glorious 12 years in Limassol. Feel free to read my posts and view my many #photosofCyprus. However in 2016 we had to return permanently to UK due to family ill health. We're now living on the Fylde coast where the river Wyre meets the Irish sea in the north west of England. More places for us to discover as this part of the UK is not so familiar to us either.

Cyprus Explosion – news items added today.

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LATEST CYPRUS EXPLOSION NEWS

Tuesday 13th February 2012

TWO FORMER ministers and six army and fire service officers charged with manslaughter in connection with last year’s naval base blast will be formally charged on April 23, Larnaca court said yesterday. Papacostas said he was at least given “the opportunity to tell it like it is in court so that the truth finally shines”. Read the full article in the Cyprus-Mail

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Monday 13th February 2012

Cyprus may not receive aid for Mari blast.

Daily Politis reported that the European Commission’s Directorate General for Regional Policy has recommended “not to mobilise the Solidarity Fund for the application” because “the disaster referred to in the application from Cyprus cannot be considered to be meeting the criteria.”  Read more

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Friday 10th February 2012

THE family of a fireman killed in a munitions blast last year yesterday filed an application at the Supreme Court to lift President Demetris Christofias’ immunity so that he can be prosecuted for the death.

Two ministers along with six army and fire service officers have since been indicted in connection with the blast but no charges have been brought against Christofias who enjoys immunity under Article 45 of the constitution.

The July 11 blast, caused by decaying munitions stored haphazardly at the Evangelos Florakis naval base, killed 13 people and crippled the adjacent power station – the island’s main source of electricity.

The munitions had been seized from the Monchegorsk, a Syria-bound Cyprus-flagged ship that sailed from Iran and were confiscated in February 2009 after it was determined they were in breach of United Nations Security Council resolutions on Iran.

The containers had been placed at the base, exposed to the elements, until their explosion.

Read the full article online in the Cyprus-Mail

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Past stories, events and archives can be found on my main page Cyprus Explosion – Latest News.

I’m still updating my page with news and updates on the Cyprus Explosion which took place at Vasilikos Power Station and the Evangelos Florakis Naval Base locations in  Moni, Limassol on Monday 11th July 2011.

What caused the Cyprus Explosion?
The blast was caused by deteriorating munitions stored in 98 containers and exposed to the elements at the naval base for over two years. The munitions had been seized from a ship travelling from Iran to Syria in 2009. The cargo was unloaded on the island on February 13 after Cyprus confirmed a breach of the UN security council resolutions on Iran.

Don’t forget, I now have a stand alone page that is dedicated to events surrounding the tragic and unnecessary deaths of 13 men.

To catch up on past and present news, please visit the independent page on my blog: Cyprus Explosion – Latest News.



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Author: Fylde Coast Musings aka CyprusPictures

I'm "Shell" or Michele - formerly a UK Expat living in Cyprus since March 2004. Sadly, we had to return to UK in April 2016 due to family illness. We now live "over Wyre" where the "River meets the Sea" at Knott End on Sea, Fylde coast, Lancashire. If you like my photos, you can see more of them on Flickr (Thulborn-Chapman Photography): http://www.flickr.com/photos/cypruspictures/albums/ and don't forget to check me out on Twitter too - you can find me: @CyprusPictures aka Fylde Coast Musings Enjoy!

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